Fluxus Discovery

•November 4, 2008 • Leave a Comment

For this project, I have worked closely with Ben to develop plans for what should be done at each location he chose.  We decided what the particpants should do at each location and what content we would provide.  I went to each of the locations with Ben and took photographs that will be used on the website that Michael is developing.  I also did the filming and editing of two of the videos we will use and will be working with Ben on a third.  I am also working on the text information that will be provided for some of the locations.  For my work on this project, I believe I deserve an A.

Response to online projects

•October 15, 2008 • Leave a Comment

Plundr was decidedly my favorite of the online projects.  Admittedly, it is due in great part to my fascination with pirates.  I liked their method of combining a computer game with real-world locations.  I found Sidewalk Squirrel to be extremely cheesy, though I suppose it fits for their target audience of children.  Locomatrix seems rather similar to Sidewalk Squirrel, though it seems to target a slightly older audience.  I don’t entirely understand how either of those games work, though.

Locative Game Proposal

•October 15, 2008 • Leave a Comment

My game proposal is similar to geocaching in that the players will be looking for caches.  Instead of leaving something in the cache they will be taking out a piece of a puzzle (like a jigsaw puzzle.)  There will be a specific starting and ending point, but the player will not have to complete the caches in a specific order.  Each piece will have part of an image on one side and a riddle, puzzle, and/or clue specific to another location.  While the player will not absolutely need the clue to find the geocache, they will need all of the pieces to complete the game.  By solving the mini-puzzle, the player will have a better idea of where the goecache is.  Once the player has found all of the pieces of the puzzle, they will see that the larger image shows a map to the final destination.  At this location will be a special geocache with prizes for the people who make it there and a book for them to add a message about their experience in completing the game.

Seattle Story

•October 13, 2008 • Leave a Comment

For my story map, I chose to tell the fictional story of a woman walking from The Pike Place Public Market to The Space Needle.

Online Projects

•October 13, 2008 • Leave a Comment

Of the projects, the one I enjoyed the most was “Seven Maps.” I especially liked the reverse house of cards on fire in “Invitation.” While I felt map 3 failed in its goal to make me laugh, I found map 5 quite amusing. I thought Robert Croma made excellent use of sound in his videos, though I found “Rules of Engagement” rather disturbing. I agree with Aaron Valdez’s description of “Blandlands” as “boring landscapes.” Nothing much seems to be happening.

The Drift

•October 13, 2008 • Leave a Comment

From Drift

Downtown Vancouver

The Plan

Beginning at 25th and Main Street, I travel to the next intersection and choose a different direction to travel.  Possible directions are backward, forward, left, and right.  When I feel like I have gone far enough, I choose the most direct path back to starting point.

25th and Main: Go Forward on Main

From Drift
From Drift


24th and Main:  Turn Right onto 24th

Leaving Main Street, I hear the sound of running water.  I see a sign to a park and want to go in, but I am not allowed.  I have just turned right and must save the park for another day.

From Drift

The sign to the park is uninviting, anyway.  A lot of negativity for one sign.

From Drift

I find the source of the running water.  Water falls into a pool covered with foam that reminds me of a bubble bath.  It has a distinct smell that I cannot describe.

From Drift

Down the street from the park, I notice a tall brick building.

From Drift

I stare at it for a moment and think it looks like retirement housing. I ask someone leaving the building, and they confirm it. What is it about retirement housing that makes them all look the same?

From Drift

As I continue down the street, I notice that all of the houses are old and have large porches and well-kept lawns. Many of the houses have American Flags in the front yards.


24th and Columbia: Turn Left onto Columbia

From Drift

As I walk through the neighborhood, I notice that a lot of things are done for decoration. Most of the houses have shrubs.

23rd and Columbia: Turn Right onto 23rd

As I walk down the street, I notice that it smells like October. The air is crisp and smells of flowers and dead leaves.

23rd and Daniels: Turn Left onto Daniels

From Drift

All of the houses seem to fit together except one. This house seems to want to stand out. The house is dwarfed by trees that don’t belong here, yet seem to be thriving.

21st and Daniels: Go Forward on Daniels

There is no street sign at the intersection to tell me where I am. I decide to continue on Daniels Street.

From Drift

20th and Daniels: Turn Left onto 20th

From Drift

Plants hang over the sidewalk. Instead of growing straight up, they grow sideways.

20th and Columbia: Go Forward on 20th

From Drift

I see an unusual tree. It’s branches reach out with leaves that remind me of wings.

From Drift

20th and Washington: Turn Right onto Washington

From Drift

As I walk down Washington Street I notice that these houses all have fences. It reminds me of the saying, “good fences make good neighbors.”

19th and Washington: Go Forward on Washington

I notice that I am heading away from the quiet residential neighborhood and into a noisy area with businesses.

McLoughlin and Washington: Turn Left onto McLoughlin

Despite the traffic noise, I can hear the sound of dead leaves blowing across the pavement and the crosswalk sign beeping.

McLoughlin and Main: Go Forward on McLoughlin

From Drift

As I cross the street, I notice a small shopping center. It reminds me of Mike Daisey talking about Wal-Mart taking over his hometown.

McLoughlin and Broadway: Turn Right onto Broadway

From Drift

I see a car inside a building and think it looks odd. Of course, I do not find anything strange about a car being in a garage.

17th and Broadway: Go Forward on Broadway

From Drift

At first it seems quieter, but soon it is broken by a noisy bus.

16th and Broadway: Turn Left onto 16th

While there are still a lot of businesses around, it continues to seem quieter here. At the end of the block, I decide it is time to turn back. I determine that the most direct route back is to go three blocks North and one block West, followed by four blocks North and one block West.

16th and C: Turn Left onto C

From Drift

Before I get very far, a squirrel darts across my path. I have seen several of the during my walk, but this is the first I am able to capture.

19th and C: Turn Left onto 19th

From Drift

As I reach the next intersection, I notice an empty lot. This is the first one I have seen. Elsewhere, the houses are crammed together. I suppose this space will be filled someday, as well.

19th and Broadway: Turn Right onto Broadway

From Drift

Walking along Broadway, I notice a sign stuck in a tree. It seems as if the tree is trying to consume the sign.

From Drift

Further down the street, I notice that most of the houses have been converted into businesses. It seems wrong to me.

25th and Broadway: Turn Left onto 25th

I return to my car. It is not until I am mapping out the trip on Google that I notice the unintentional pattern to my travels. In most case, I have gone two blocks in one direction before turning in another.

Walking in the City

•October 1, 2008 • Leave a Comment

I tried to read it, really I did.  I just don’t understand it.  Plus, it is hard to read about the World Trade Center now that it is gone.